sophist-org300:

Video that I show on the first day of class.

For COM 321: An Introduction to the CCO perspective

resume-quality-control:

Good example to inspire you.

This is nice, clean, organized, and simple. It also present information in a believable manner. This is likely to appeal to recruiters in professions in the creative design field. I’m not sure I like the graphics, but they reflect personality.

history-mystery-timetravel:

My resume: Plain. Simple. Organized. Word. Figured I’d throw it up on my page seeing as dust is starting to settle on it from my lack of posting.

The word is linked to oniomania and it’s etymology is Greek: onio- ('for sale') and -mania (‘madness’). 

The word functions as a double entendre if you thinking about it: 1. your brain is for ‘sale’ as you chase the ‘sale.’

(via theyuniversity)

From the archives of my old blog:

resume-quality-control:

The color and graphic is nice. Layout is clean with lots of white space. However, why does your education sound like it’s in the present tense when it ended in November 2011?—i.e., “Working towards my AA.” Also, the resume is not likely appeal to the audience mentioned in skills. My recommendation: Craft two resumes. The first for creative freelance jobs (use a modified version of this one) and the second in a functional format (more traditional, using black/white color scheme) and focus on explaining your accomplishments in sales and customer service.

Need help?: http://sophist.es

digital-e-motion:

My resume > Your resume :)
If this doesn’t get me a job, I don’t know what will. 

fastcompany:

A theory Malcolm Gladwell popularized in Outliers—that 10,000 hours of practice can turn anyone into an expert—probably isn’t true, a new study says.
Read More>

Man, psychologists really don’t like Malcolm Gladwell.

fastcompany:

A theory Malcolm Gladwell popularized in Outliers—that 10,000 hours of practice can turn anyone into an expert—probably isn’t true, a new study says.

Read More>

Man, psychologists really don’t like Malcolm Gladwell.

(via hacking-curriculum)

elmhurst-college Communication Studies majors — If you think you’re worthy. :-)

This was shared by Luv, one of my former students in intercultural communication. He is absolutely correct, this is a good example of different cultural readings on a phenomenon and how culture can ‘augment’ games. 

Here is a video that’s part of the linked article, embedded for your convenience: